Lisa Duggan – Mean Girl

Ayn Rands complicated notoriety as popular writer, leader of a political and philosophical cult, reviled intellectual, and ostentatious public figure endured beyond her death in 1982. In the 21st century, she has been resurrected as a serious reference point for mainstream figures, especially those on the political right, from Paul Ryan to Donald Trump. Mean Girl follows Rands trail through the 20th century from the Russian Revolution to the Cold War and traces her posthumous appeal and the influence of her novels via her cruel, surly, sexy heroes. Outlining the impact of Rands philosophy of selfishness, Mean Girl illuminates the Randian shape of our neoliberal, contemporary culture of greed and the dilemmas we face in our political present.
Listen…
Please follow and like us:

Chelsea Martin – Caca Dolce – Essays from a Lowbrow Life

For anyone who has ever felt weird or poor or misunderstood or just…weird, well, this is the book for you. Martin chronicles her own bizarre upbringing in such a way that the strangeness of it all manages to still feel universal. She recounts everything from her attempt to manifest an alien invasion (she was just 11; what 11-year-old doesn’t want ET to visit?) to the fights she had with her family, to what it was like to be diagnosed with Tourette’s Syndrome as an adolescent. It’s a wild ride of a memoir, and a true glimpse into the mind of an artist as she’s figuring out what life is all about.” (Kristin Iversen, Nylon)
Listen…
Please follow and like us:

Phillis Wheatley – Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley, a Native African and a Slave

Margaretta Matilda Odell’s 1834 Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley is the only substantive early source on Wheatley’s life. Phillis Wheatley (ca. 1753-1784) is considered the first African American poet to write for a transatlantic audience, and her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773) kindled debates about race.
Listen…
Please follow and like us: