Mark Whitaker – Conversations with Gandhi

For most of the time between 1906 and 1914 a young Englishwoman by the name of Millie Graham Polak, together with her husband, shared the same house in South Africa as Mahatma Gandhi and his family; she and Gandhi talked about everything under the sun, and Millie wrote down their conversations, later publishing them in a small book. This programme recreates those revealing exchanges.
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Mike Hally – The Bee Inspector

Who do you call when your bees stop buzzing or the honey goes off? Why, the Bee Inspector of course. He may be the man from the Ministry, but David Kemp is the saviour of many a bee-keeper. What’s more he’s full of fascinating facts about these extraordinary little creatures and he has that rare gift of conveying his enthusiasm in everyday language.
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Charlotte Crofts – Angela Carter’s Love Affair with Radio

Angela Carter’s relationship with radio began with an accidental sound effect. She went on to write two docu-dramas, Come Unto These Yellow Sands (about the Victorian painter Richard Dadd) and A Self-Made Man (about Edwardian novelist Ronald Firbank), and re-worked two of her short stories into radio plays. Carter loved radio’s technical possibilities: the opportunity to extend the power of the written word, blurring the lines of traditional narrative into ‘three-dimensional story-telling’. This documentary weaves interviews with Carter’s friends and colleagues Susannah Clapp, Carmen Callil, Marina Warner and Christopher Frayling, memories of the studio technicians who worked on her plays and the responses of listeners who heard them, with extracts from the plays themselves. Academic Charlotte Crofts explains why the medium suited her so well. Producer: Sara Davies.
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Robin Ince – Bertrand Russell: The First Media Academic?

Bertrand Russell was one of the greatest thinkers of the last century. His contributions to the fields of mathematics and philosophy are widely acknowledged as some of the most important of their kind. But he also brought his brand of rationalism and intellect to an audience far beyond the academic and political circles he routinely mixed with.
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Lavinia Greenlaw – The Chess Girls

The emergence of the Polgar sisters in the 1970s and 80s rocked the chess world. In a heavily male dominated game, the three Hungarian girls broke record after record. The youngest, Judit, was talked of as a potential world champion. The Chess Girls is the story of their parents, Laszlo and Klara Polgar, and how they defied the Communist authorities to conduct a remarkable educational experiment. Laszlo Polgar, convinced that any healthy child can be trained to become a genius, set out to prove his theory with his own children.
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Carol Leifer – When You Lie About Your Age, The Terrorists Win

Not long ago it occurred to Carol Leifer that she had to stop telling one of her favorite stories seeing The Beatles perform at Shea Stadium because it dated her. But then she thought: whats that about? I see now that when you deny your age, you deny yourself, she says, and when you lie about your age, you become your inauthentic twin. But most importantly, when you lie about your age, they win. (And of course by they, I mean the terrorists).
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